The inside dope

Kash Heed may no longer be in charge of the province's law enforcement policies. But the former solicitor general appears to have been helping influence them south of the border, Public Eye has learned. The former West Vancouver chief constable was a scheduled panelist at two recent conferences sponsored by the New York-headquartered Drug Policy Alliance, which works to "advance policies that reduce the harms of both drug misuse and drug prohibition." The conferences - one of which took place in Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles - discussed "strategies for moving beyond drug war policies and toward a health-centered approach to drug use."

Mr. Heed didn't respond to a request for comment placed on Monday about those conferences or his position on marijuana.

In 2001, the then Vancouver police inspector told a senate committee he supported "the removal of criminal penalties for small, private possession of cannabis as a means of reducing the economic costs of law enforcement and the social costs of arrests of people who are otherwise not criminally involved."

Mr. Heed elaborated on that position during the recent election, explained to the Canadian Corp., "I'm against legalization of any drugs...My position is to have a debate on the other options that are available and part of it is decriminalizing. Also, part is keeping the current drug laws we have."

7 Comments

It would be interesting to know who is picking up the tab for this.

What he told the senate committee years ago made sense then and still makes sense now. Continuing the present system will yield the same results so common sense suggests that we need new approaches.

I suppose another possibility is stricter laws and more enforcement. We can increase penalties and prohibition efforts until half the citizenry is in jail while the other half works full time to keep them there.

"It would be interesting to know who is picking up the tab for this. "

Easy to figure out. Kash Heed is paying his own way.

Maybe he was attending these conferences to pass out his resume. He needs a backup plan after he gets recalled.

To get the real answer as to who paid, we will have to wait for the government expenses review sometimes later.

"Maybe he was attending these conferences to pass out his resume. He needs a backup plan after he gets recalled. "

No worries there. He can always go back to police work or do the consultative circuit.

I'm not too sure Heed would try to go back to being a cop as he left under a cloud for disclosing information. Consultation for whom? Maybe Gordo and crew

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