Someone isn't drinking the Kool-Aid

The Campbell administration's recent decision to increase the maximum payable salaries for its deputy ministers has given the labour movement an excuse to remind British Columbians the provincial minimum wage "has been frozen at $8 an hour since 2001." For his part, Labour and Citizens' Services Minister Iain Black says there's no "compelling need" to thaw out that wage "when you're seeing such a small percentage of the population in the minimum wage bracket." This, according to the Daily News's Kris Schumacher. But British Columbian business leaders don't seem so adamantly opposed to such a raise. According to an advertisement promoting Business in Vancouver's business advisory board, 53 percent of those leaders "support the provincial government implementing a raise in the minimum wage to $10." And here's another surprise: just 46 percent "believe that public-private partnerships tend to decrease the overall cost to the public." Fancy that! The following is a complete copy of the text of that advertisement.

Business Wish List #5

I wish I had a place to share my opinions on business issues in BC.

And now you do. Business in Vancouver and Ipsos Reid have created the BIV-Ipsos Business Advisory Board - an online forum for senior-level business decision makers to voice opinions on topics important to business in British Columbia. Join and be part of the discussion.

We know what business leaders all across BC are thinking. Do you? Test yourself!

What percentage of BC's business professionals...

a) disagree with the statement that their company is effectively sharing the news of their green intiatives with consumers?

b) support the provincial government implementing a raise in the minimum wage to $10?

c) agree that controlling increasing health care costs should be made a top priority for the BC government?

d) believe that public-private partnerships tend to decrease the overall cost to the public?

Be part of the answers! Join the BIV-Ipsos Business Advisory Board at www.joinbiv.com and receive a $5 coffee card.

Answers: a) 85% b) 53% c) 49% d) 49%

4 Comments

Labour and Citizens' Services Minister Iain Black says there's no "compelling need" to thaw out that wage "when you're seeing such a small percentage of the population in the minimum wage bracket."

BC Stats reports that as of 2006:

21.8% earn UNDER $10,000 (note - this is below current min wage)

01.2% earn OVER $150,000

Yeah, there sure is no compelling need when you're in the top 1.2 percent of the population you nitwit.

Kids, this is why voting is important.

The people who aren't drinking the kool-aid are business leaders and other taxpayers. All the people who no longer matter to Gordon and his cronies.

Haven't seen anything on PPP's lately. Have communities learned how to avoid them?

Are there any credible examples of successful PPP's in Australia, New Zealand or the UK? They have similar government structures and they all seem to be gung-ho for these things. Lots of reports of failures - but has there ever been a successful implementation of a PPP - something that is past the early stages? An example with some history of a few years to draw upon?

They should have included a packet of kool-aid with the 100$ cheques.

What in the world are "PPP"s?

Sorry for using an acronym without defining it - i hate that!

public-private partnerships = ppp

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