Meanwhile, at the trough

In June 2006, following a "careful examination of the senior public service labour market across the country," the Campbell concluded "changes are needed to maintain B.C.'s competitiveness in recruiting and retaining the talent necessary to lead the public service." Which is why the government increased the maximum payable salary for deputy ministers "from $203,500 to $221,760 and from $223,850 to $243,936 for the deputy minister to the Premier." At the time, the government promised those salaries would be reviewed again in four years. So we find it somewhat surprising to see the government announce another such increase - just two years later!

Under the new compensation framework, the maximum payable salary for deputy ministers will increase "from $221,760 to $299,215 and from $243,936 to $348,600 for the deputy minister to the Premier." The reason: "A careful examination of the senior public service labour market across the country demonstrates that executive compensation in British Columbia is not keeping pace. Changes are needed to maintain B.C.'s competitiveness in recruiting and retaining the talent necessary to lead the public service." Where have we heard that before?

Following the 2006 increase, British Columbia had the fifth highest paid deputy ministers in the country, receiving 78 percent the pay of their federal counterparts. This most recent increase means British Columbia will have the third highest paid deputy ministers in the country, receiving 83 percent the pay of their federal counterparts. The following is a complete copy of both announcements.

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INFORMATION BULLETIN

For Immediate Release

2006OTP0130-000974

July 21, 2006

Office of the Premier

CHANGE TO SENIOR PUBLIC SERVICE SALARY RANGES ANNOUNCED

VICTORIA - Today the government announced changes to deputy minister and assistant deputy minister salary ranges.

Deputy minister maximum possible compensation will move from a ranking of sixth place nationally to fifth, behind Ontario, the Northwest Territories, Alberta and the federal government. In addition, the bonus system for deputy ministers will be eliminated. A five per cent salary holdback component, based on performance, will be introduced for both deputy ministers and assistant deputy ministers. Total compensation for assistant deputy ministers, which presently ranks at 10th place across 13 government jurisdictions in Canada, will now move to sixth.

A careful examination of the senior public service labour market across the country demonstrates that executive compensation in British Columbia is not keeping pace. Changes are needed to maintain B.C.'s competitiveness in recruiting and retaining the talent necessary to lead the public service.

Effective August 1, 2006, the maximum payable salary to deputy ministers will increase from $203,500 to $221,760 and from $223,850 to $243,936 for the deputy minister to the Premier. The maximum achievable salary for assistant deputy ministers will increase from $114,492 to $160,000, though the average salary will be $130,000 per ministry. Of the 129 senior public service positions reviewed, some executives are already correctly compensated considering the labour market and will not receive any increase at this time. Others will receive an increase based on the scope and complexity of their roles.

Deputy ministers' compensation in British Columbia was last adjusted in 2001. At that time, it was set at 83 per cent of federal salaries. By 2006, it ranked 68 per cent of federal salaries. With the new adjustments, deputy minister' salaries would fall at about 78 per cent of their federal counterparts. Salaries will reviewed again in four years.

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INFORMATION BULLETIN
For Immediate Release
2008ALMD0051-001220
Aug. 8, 2008

Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development
BC Public Service Agency

REVISED PUBLIC SERVICE EXECUTIVE PAY FRAMEWORK

VICTORIA - The Province has revised its compensation framework for executive level employees of the professional BC Public Service to bring B.C. more in line with other jurisdictions across Canada.

Like most employers in Canada, the BC Public Service faces significant challenges due to an aging workforce. The challenge is greatest at the executive level. Forecasts show that within 10 years over 65 per cent of assistant deputy ministers and 51 per cent of deputy ministers will retire. A careful examination of the senior public service labour market across the country demonstrates that executive compensation in British Columbia is not keeping pace. Changes are needed to maintain B.C.'s competitiveness in recruiting and retaining the talent necessary to lead the public service.

A comparison of current compensation levels of public service jurisdictions across Canada shows that B.C. ranks 10th for assistant deputy minister compensation and sixth for deputy minister compensation. The new framework will place the BC Public Service third among the provinces and the federal government. Deputy minister compensation will be set at 83 per cent of federal salaries, as it was prior to 2006, and will be subject to the same regular review cycle to ensure ongoing competitiveness.

Effective Aug. 1, 2008, the maximum payable salary to deputy ministers increased from $221,760 to $299,215 and from $243,936 to $348,600 for the deputy minister to the Premier. The maximum achievable salary for assistant deputy ministers increased from $160,000 to $195,000. The salary holdback component, which is based on specific performance measures linked to leadership on building the corporate human resources of the Province, will increase from five per cent of salary to 10 per cent of salary for both deputy ministers and assistant deputy ministers.

In 2006, the Province released the first Corporate Human Resource Plan for the BC Public Service, setting out an ambitious agenda to increase the competitiveness of B.C.'s professional public service as an employer to ensure it is able to attract and retain the skilled people needed to deliver services to British Columbians. More information on that plan and employment opportunities with the BC Public Service is available at www.employment.gov.bc.ca.

3 Comments

Isn't this the outfit that cuts off disabled folks at 19 if their IQ is one point over seventy.A surplus serves the depuites first and the poor last if ever. But as some MLA said. We have to pay top dollar to get the best, and other provinces pay more. He sort of left out the huge population difference in Ontario. You indicate Murrey Cole was confusing numbers.Murry is often confused. Mind you in beautiful BC the deputies dont report to the Minister, they report to King Gordo so anything goes. The school up the road was shur down a couple of years after a seismic upgrage which makes little sense, but lots of things Gordo does, doesn't make sense. We just sit here and eat it.

The source of your link appears to have something interesting in it when the government lays out the parameters of whom to include in the comparisons with British Columbia:

"Deputy minister maximum possible compensation will move from a ranking of sixth place nationally to fifth, behind Ontario, the Northwest Territories, Alberta and the federal government.">/i>

However, on another web page of the Government's, on page 2, of Public Service Executive Compensation its quite specific of whom to exclude in their Market Comparaters: "item 2... other provincial jurisdictions and federal government (excluding northern territory jurisdictions)"

Page 4 has the Executive payout for Deputy Ministers..... why is it that Jessica McDonald car/lease amount is so much higher than other Deputy Ministers, and poor old Mr. Brown (Chief of Staff) gets nothing?

Dave, the NWT has an extremely high cost of living (makes downtown vanc look like a deal and a half!), AND they pay out a northern living allowance.

The income amounts for the North are not comparable to the south for these very reasons - it skews the facts.

Likely that's why BC used them in justifiying the oinkers snuffling up the trough yet again.

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