As simple as ABC

Earlier, The Globe and Mail's Wendy Stueck reported the mining industry was "totally caught off guard" by the provincial government's decision to close the door on uranium mining. This, according to the Association for Mineral Exploration of British Columbia president Dan Jepsen. And Boss Power Inc. president Dan Stone - whose company owns the controversial Blizzard Uranium Claim - also expressed his displeasure. But Mr. Stone - who recently hired Cindy Burton to lobby the provincial government on behalf of his firm - and Mr. Jepsen aren't isn't the only ones concerned about the ban.

In a letter addressed to Premier Gordon Campbell, former British Columbia Geological Survey member B. Neil Church writes, "We feel that the government has been ill-informed in deciding to return to the uranium moratorium. The global investment community will remember the government freeze on development of the Windy-Craggy deposit in the 70's and many other major and minor projects that resulted in the "˜ABC' mantra (Anywhere but British Columbia). As an active member of the of the local mining-exploration community, I urge you and your government not to damage or seriously alter the mineral investment climate in British Colombia, especially at this time when metal commodity prices are high and there is much attraction elsewhere for development funding." The following is a complete copy of his letter.

***

April 28th, 2008
Honourable Gordon Campbell
Premier
PO Box 9041 Stn Prov Govt
Parliament Buildings
Victoria, B.C., V8W 9E1

Dear Premier Campbell

I am writing to convey my concern with the recent remarks by your Minister of State for Mining, Mr. Kevin Kruger, who has proclaimed a prohibition against exploration and development of uranium (reported by the Globe and Mail, April 26th/08).

Since expiry of the uranium moratorium in 1987, imposed by the previous Social Credit Government, there has been new research prompting more uranium exploration in British Columbia. Much progress has been made in the science of extraction and handling uranium. Indeed, many uranium deposits in British Columbia appear to be amenable to the widely used low environmental impact in situ solution leach "˜ISL' recovery process. Solution mining is a relatively new method whereby ore is treated in situ. The ISL process reverses the ore genesis in a very short time frame. Most operating ISL mines are small and less than 10 years old yet they supply 85% of the current US uranium production. There is little surface disturbance and no tailings or waste rock generated. Techniques for ISL have evolved to the point where the procedures work within strict environmental controls and considerable cost savings compared to traditional mining methods.

The combined production of uranium in Canada from six provinces and three territories amounts to 25-30 % of the total annual world production. Uranium mining and development in Canada is highly regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

Nuclear power using uranium fuel is seen as a major solution towards the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in the greening of global energy production.

We feel that the government has been ill-informed in deciding to return to the uranium moratorium. The global investment community will remember the government freeze on development of the Windy-Craggy deposit in the 70's and many other major and minor projects that resulted in the "˜ABC' mantra (Anywhere but British Columbia).

As an active member of the of the local mining-exploration community, I urge you and your government not to damage or seriously alter the mineral investment climate in British Colombia, especially at this time when metal commodity prices are high and there is much attraction elsewhere for development funding.

Yours Sincerely,

B. Neil Church Ph.D., P.Eng.
600 Parkridge St.
Victoria, B.C., V8Z 6N7

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